New Study Shows Universe is Older Than Previously Thought

According to brand new scientific research, the universe is 100 million years older than prior estimates have gauged. Emerging statistical analysis from the European Space Agency has revealed that the universe is 13.8 billions years old. The evidence stems from data gathered by the Planck spacecraft in a project that began in 2009. The accumulation of information was focused on measuring the trace residuum of microwave radiation that has lingered throughout the universe since originating as a byproduct of the Big Bang.

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The new study is unique from its predecessors, because it compiled the most comprehensive collection of data on the existence of microwave remnants. Previous studies have attempted to map out the radiation, but none have amassed such concrete substance. This is because the Planck vessel is equipped with significantly higher degrees of sensitivity for measuring the finite fluctuations in temperature that are indicative of compacted space. These dense sections represent unexpanded galaxies and star systems near the origin point of the Big Bang. Following the wavelength shifts of the microwaves has allowed for the most accurate measurement of the universe’s age that has ever been made. There are a bevy of inherent implications that generate alongside this advancement in knowledge.

A primary shift in human understanding of the universe is the accompanying protraction in the universe’s growth rate. Inevitably, expansion would have had to occur at a slower rate to reach its current size, since more time has to be allotted into the formula for calculating the speed of universal increase. This slower expansion confounds the currently accepted definitions of time by altering the dimensional dynamic to facilitate an imperceptible reduction in the pace of light travel. Gravitational pulls have also been proven to have a much more prominent influence on galactic arrangements than earlier studies have estimated; their delicate presences were detectable in nearly every aspect of the universe’s procurement.

Furthermore, the Planck’s research was able to track cosmic activity to almost the exact moment of the universe’s beginning. This is the closest view of the Big Bang that mankind has ever glimpsed. It pinpoints motion within an infinitesimally small percentage of a nanosecond after the moment the universe outwardly expanded its size by exponents of a trillion.

The full scientific insinuations of the research have yet to be completely released. The project has been conducted over the course of four years, and the research that has been publicly analyzed only comprises the first fifteen months of the mission. The recorded information will continue to be dissected and disseminated to the masses; however, the data from the earliest stage of existence has yet to be released.

Solid definitions of the universe’s compositional make-up are now more precisely determined than any point in all of human history. The statistics released demonstrate that all quantifiable matter represents less than one-twentieth of the entire cosmos. This statistic encompasses every star, planet and galaxy. Dark matter accounts for 26.8 percent of space. The presence of dark matter can only be measured by the bends in gravitational pull it can cause, because it does not respond to light in any known way. The majority of the universe consists of dark energy, which amounts to 69 percent of its composition. This element promotes faster universal expansion and is unaffected by gravity.

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